Cases, but also cafeteria duty, await Gorsuch at high court

Posted April 16, 2017

Neil Gorsuch was sworn in as a Supreme Court justice on Monday, filling the vacancy left on the nation's highest court by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia a year ago, reports the Blaze.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's influence on healthcare policy may be initially limited, one expert predicted following his swearing in on Monday.

"I have no doubt you will rise to the occasion and that the decisions you will make will not only protect our Constitution today, but for many generations of Americans to come", Trump said. "Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president", he said at the time.

"He will decide cases based not on his personal preferences, but based on a fair and objective reading of the law", he said.

"And I got it done in the first 100 days, that's even nice", he told reporters, White House aides, and guests gathered in the Rose Garden. As with the entire confirmation process, the final swearing-in of the new ninth justice was saturated with political cant and hypocrisy, an inseparable part of rituals that have always been emptied of any genuine democratic content.

And he can begin shaping the court's caseload, providing yet another vote for which cases the justices will hear.

He also thanked by name Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, both of whom fended off Democrats' multiple attempts to derail his nomination.

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During last year's presidential campaign, Trump pledged to pick a justice who would overturn the landmark 1973 Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling that legalised abortion.

"I think this is a way to kind of humble people", said Kagan, who's sat on the committee for six years.

It is the conclusion of a almost 14-month process to fill Scalia's seat, with Republicans winning a bitter battle to ensure his replacement was a like-minded disciple who will restore a conservative majority on the court for years to come.

Senate Republicans invoked the "nuclear option" — allowing all future Supreme Court nominees to pass with a 51-vote simple majority instead of the previous 60-vote threshold.

"I will never forget that to whom much is given, much is expected", he said. They include a religious rights case on April 19 in which a Missouri church is objecting to being denied state funds for a playground project due to a state ban on providing public money to religious organisations.

Start by making him take notes and answer the door at the justices' private meetings. And there are cases already heard that might be deadlocked at 4-4 in which Gorsuch could be asked to cast the deciding vote after a rehearing.