Arab nations add names to terror list amid Qatar dispute

Posted June 12, 2017

The escalating crisis in the Persian Gulf erupted this week when Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Bahrain cut diplomatic ties with Qatar. On Sunday, Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah Al Khaled Al Sabah said in a statement that Qatar is "willing to hold a dialogue" to end the crisis and that unity among Gulf nations remains "paramount".

Bahrain joined Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Egypt and other states this past week in cutting ties with Qatar over what they say is the emirate's financing of extremist groups and its ties to Iran, Saudi Arabia's regional arch-rival. Mauritania broke off diplomatic ties with Qatar while Jordan downgraded ties with the country on June 6.

Kuwait's emir is working to mediate the Gulf crisis around Qatar, which is home to a major USA military base and the host of the 2022 Fifa World Cup.

Many people in Qatar flocked to local supermarkets and grocery stores to stock up on food items after waking up to news of Saudi Arabia closing the country's only land border.

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Emirati officials also shut down the airline's offices in the UAE on Wednesday.

Trump's administration later suggested U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who as Exxon Mobil's CEO had business with Qatar, as a possible mediator.

The statement added that the position of the four governments comes also as a result of "Qatar's actions in contravention of its (previous) commitments include: supporting and harboring elements and organizations that threaten the National security of other States". Turkey also has made a decision to send troops to a base it maintains in Qatar in a sign of support. That comes after Trump, who tweeted Tuesday about Qatar funding extremists, called Qatari ruler Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani on Wednesday and offered to host leaders at the White House to resolve the crisis.

Sheikh Mohammed told the AP that Sheikh Tamim "is not going to leave the country while the country is in blockade", in effect turning down the offer of mediation.