Huge, homely mastiff named Martha wins world's ugliest dog

Posted June 25, 2017

Ugly dogs from around the world gathered in California on Friday.

The only animal in this year's contest too big to be held by her handler, Martha beat out 13 other dogs, a lot of them the kind of older, smaller dogs who win here.

Martha is former rescue dog who went almost blind from neglect, said Ms Zindler. Moe, a 16-year-old Brussels Griffon-pug mix who was the oldest in the contest, came in second. In third place was a 14-year-old Chinese Crested-Harke mix named Chase.

While the dogs entered into the annual contest may not be the most visually appealing creatures, their quirky looks, off-beat personalities and unusual attributes are viewed as prized possessions during the contest, which is held at the Sonoma-Marin Fair in California.

The 3-year-old hound beat out 13 other canines for the title, including a bald Chinese Crested pooch and a mixed breed named Icky.

Numerous contestants are adopted.

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A blind Chihuahua-Chinese Crested mix named Sweepee Rambo bested 16 other ugly entries in last year's competition and waddled away with $1,500, a trophy and a flight to NY with her owner for media appearances.

These dogs - some with acne, others with tongues permanently sticking out - are used to getting called ugly.

"The contest has done much to raise awareness for adoption of dogs, and that no matter their physical detractions, these animals are loving companions", says the fair's website. But for their owners, it was love at first sight.

A blind Chihuahua-Chinese Crested mix named Sweepee Rambo won the 2016 competition.

The victor of the 29th annual contest held at Sonoma-Marin Fair will be decided Friday evening.

Besides the main crown, the Spirit Award is presented to a dog and owner who have overcome obstacles or provide service to their community, organizers said.