Tropical Storm Franklin continues moving through Caribbean

Posted August 09, 2017

Wind gusts of at least 80 miles per hour are possible near coastal regions of northern Veracruz if Franklin becomes a hurricane, according to AccuWeather.

Forecast for the Yucatan Peninsula: Cloudy skies, 80 percent chance of torrential storms in Campeche and intense points in the rest of the region.

Meanwhile, a smattering of disorganized storms and showers in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean was given a low chance of becoming a cyclone over the next five days.

'Winds of 40 miles per hour or greater may begin in the Yucatan peninsula and northern Belize as soon as Monday afternoon. By 2 a.m. Tuesday, Franklin's center will have already hit the Yucatan coast. Rip currents and coastal flooding are also expected.

The strengthening trend should get disrupted as the system crosses the Yucatan.

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Franklin made landfall late Monday night near Pulticub, Mexico.

What remains of Franklin will steadily strengthen, likely reaching at least minimal hurricane status before making a second Mexican landfall early Thursday morning.

Strong wind gusts from Franklin will tree damage and power outages through Tuesday, say forecasters at the Weather Channel. However, rain may still graze South Texas, and rough seas may endanger swimmers all along the state's coastline as Franklin moves into Mexico. "July steering winds over the North Atlantic favour more hurricanes than normal being steered towards U.S. shores in 2017", the forecaster said. The main inhibitor to development is the presence of some dry, stable air. Later this week, a tropical system, dubbed 99L, could also have some impact on the Leeward Islands. The less-favorable conditions could wipe out the system completely. A developed system is more likely to track north of west.

However an active season does not necessarily translate into financial and reinsurance losses, it is the direction that any tropical storms and hurricanes take that will make reinsurance firms nervous and cat bond investors hold their breath.