Trump says classified JFK files will be made public

Posted October 22, 2017

Most of the files are believed to be from the 1960s and 1970s, stemming from the 1963 assassination and aftermath.

President Donald Trump says he doesn't plan to block the scheduled release of thousands of never publicly seen government documents related to President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The CIA and Federal Bureau of Investigation, whose records make up the bulk of the batch, won't say whether they've appealed to the Republican president to keep them under wraps.

John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American statesman who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas.

By law however - and with Trump's tweeted stamp of approval - the documents are slated to be released Thursday.

Over the years, the National Archives has released most documents related to the case, but a final batch remains and only Mr Trump has the authority to decide whether some should continue to be withheld or released in redacted form.

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The Washington Post reported that a number officials at various security agencies, however, are urging the President not to release some of the papers, which are being held by the National Archives and Records Administration.

Even Trump has accused America of plotting his predecessor's death, telling Fox News in 2016 that he believed the father of Republican Senator Ted Cruz had consorted with Oswald right before the shooting.

There is some doubt whether Trump will follow through with allowing the National Archives to dispense the documents in full. No one knows exactly what information is contained in the files; the only guide is an index that vaguely lists the contents of the secret documents. "But the question remains whether he will open the library in full - every word in every document, as the law requires", Shenon said.

'And my understanding is that he won't without infuriating people at the Central Intelligence Agency and elsewhere who are determined to keep at least some of the information secret, especially in documents created in the 1990s'.

Of the tens of thousands of documents already partially released, approximately 3,100 still remain classified. "There might be stuff on why we were interested in the Cuban consulate, how we surveilled the consulate, how we did our audio work, and how did we recruit spies there?"