Drinking Coffee May Help You Live Longer, Study Says

Posted July 05, 2018

The study of almost half-a-million British adults, published yesterday in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal, showed that coffee drinkers had a slightly lower risk of death over 10 years than abstainers.

A new study claimed that drinking any kind of coffee will help people live longer, with a 12 percent lower risk of death.

Even the heaviest coffee drinkers are less likely to die early than people who don't drink coffee, new research finds.

Because some people's genetics make them slower to metabolize caffeine, the researchers wanted to see if that made coffee consumption riskier for these individuals.

But coffee drinkers in the study didn't have higher risks than non-drinkers of dying from heart disease and other blood pressure-related causes.

In a 10-year follow-up period, around 14,000 people in the study died (the leading causes of death were cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory diseases).

Your habit of guzzling coffee throughout the day could be the secret to a longer life.

"We observed an inverse association for coffee drinking with mortality, including among participants who reported drinking at least one cup per day, up to eight or more cups per day, as well as those drinking filtered, instant and decaffeinated coffee", said Dr. Erikka Loftfield, the study's lead investigator and a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute, in an email to TIME.

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"Participants drinking four or more cups per day, compared with those drinking less coffee and nondrinkers, were more likely to drink instant coffee and be current smokers, whereas participants drinking one to three cups per day were older, more likely to have a university degree, and more likely to report "excellent" health".

Moreover, to get the benefit, it didn't matter whether someone metabolized caffeine slowly or quickly.

Adding toppings to coffee like cream, sugar and whipped cream can also vastly increase calories, and possibly negate it's positive effects. That study is particularly important, as it shows these benefits apply to African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and white people.

Still, some doctors warn against starting a coffee habit.

But not only was this a very large study that demonstrated significant findings, it's one of many studies that indicate coffee may be beneficial for health.

Whatever it is, there have been multiple studies that point to coffee's health benefits. There have been however some studies that show that regular coffee intake may not be good for health.

This study also looked at another question scientists have been asking: how genetics affects coffee consumption.

The study notes that the results did not vary significantly by factors including age group, sex, and previous history heart disease or cancer.

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